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Technical details[ edit ] There are two historic tintype processes: In the wet process, a collodion emulsion containing suspended silver halide crystals had to be formed on the plate just before it was exposed in the camera while still wet. Chemical treatment then reduced the crystals to microscopic particles of metallic silver in proportion to the intensity and duration of their exposure to light, resulting in a visible image. The later and more convenient dry process was similar but used a gelatin emulsion which could be applied to the plate long before use and exposed in the camera dry. In both processes, a very underexposed negative image was produced in the emulsion. Its densest areas, corresponding to the lightest parts of the subject, appeared gray by reflected light. The areas with the least amount of silver, corresponding to the darkest areas of the subject, were essentially transparent and appeared black when seen against the dark background provided by the lacquer. The image as a whole therefore appeared to be a dull-toned positive.

Cased Images and Tintypes KwikGuide

Process[ edit ] One side of a clean glass plate was coated with a thin layer of iodized collodion , then dipped in a silver nitrate solution. The plate was exposed in the camera while still wet. Exposure times varied from five to sixty seconds or more depending on the brightness of the lighting and the speed of the camera lens. The plate was then developed and fixed. The resulting negative , when viewed by reflected light against a black background, appears to be a positive image: This effect was integrated by backing the plate with black velvet; by taking the picture on a plate made of dark reddish-colored glass the result was called a ruby ambrotype ; or by coating one side of the plate with black varnish.

A tintype, also known as a melainotype or ferrotype, is a photograph made by creating a direct positive on a thin sheet of metal coated with a dark lacquer or enamel and used as the support for the photographic es enjoyed their widest use during the s and s, but lesser use of the medium persisted into the early 20th century and it has been revived as a novelty and fine.

The Wizard is simple — you just have to peruse the multiple choices and click where appropriate. How Does the Wizard Work? The majority of card mounts were produced by a limited number of stationery printers who then customised them for a particular photographer by adding name, address, patrons, medals and various other individual requirements. Therefore, a particular design of card mount used in Manchester would be used at approximately the same time in York and Brighton as well — in fact countrywide.

Many characteristics were short lived as new mount designs and features were constantly introduced by the printers to encourage photographers to buy more mounts so as to remain up to date and in fashion. Some card mounts were produce by local printers and may not conform to the styles of the national providers. If it does not do so, because your photograph is one of the exceptions, we will custom date it personally for you at no extra cost. Explore the world of Victorian cartes de visite and cabinet cards — see all of the most popular designs.

Just a few examples are shown below to whet your appetite!

Types of Photograph

Search our online catalogue here! We are in the process of adding more and more of our collections to our on-line catalogue, LibCat. You can use the search box to the left, the word cloud, or the other links on this page to search the on-line catalogue, view information about ongoing and completed projects, or learn about library and special collections.

WORLD WAR ONE ERA CABINET CARD OF SOLDIER GETTING A SHAVE. Nice cabinet card image of a soldier seated in a barber’s chair with an apprehensive look on his face closely watching the barber that is preparing to shave him.

Technical details[ edit ] There are two historic tintype processes: In the wet process, a collodion emulsion containing suspended silver halide crystals had to be formed on the plate just before it was exposed in the camera while still wet. Chemical treatment then reduced the crystals to microscopic particles of metallic silver in proportion to the intensity and duration of their exposure to light, resulting in a visible image.

The later and more convenient dry process was similar but used a gelatin emulsion which could be applied to the plate long before use and exposed in the camera dry. In both processes, a very underexposed negative image was produced in the emulsion. Its densest areas, corresponding to the lightest parts of the subject, appeared gray by reflected light. The areas with the least amount of silver, corresponding to the darkest areas of the subject, were essentially transparent and appeared black when seen against the dark background provided by the lacquer.

The image as a whole therefore appeared to be a dull-toned positive. To obtain as light-toned an image as possible, potassium cyanide , a very dangerous and powerful deadly poison, was normally employed as the photographic fixer. It was perhaps the most acutely hazardous of all the several highly toxic chemicals originally used in this and many other early photographic processes.

Stamford Historical Society Photo Archives

Early image on a thin iron plate resembling tin. By far the most common of the three for sports subjects. Early mage on a silver-coated copper plate.

Photograph Identification Guide by David Rudd Cycleback. Tintypes, Daguerreotypes and Ambrotypes.

We all have old family photos. These may be loose or in albums or they may be in the form of postcards or even fragile black and grey glass negatives. So what about dating? Photography started in but at that time was really in the hands of a few scientists, professionals or wealthy amateurs. Not many family photographs exist from that era unless they are beautiful images on a polished silver plate that looks like a mirror.

These are daguerreotypes as invented by Daguerre in France. Around , photos were produced which were actually weak negatives on glass but, when backed with a dark material or black paint, appeared as normal positive images: Up to this stage, photos were generally one-offs, there was no negative and multiple copies were impracticable.

Any copies required had to be photographed from the original — often with a distinct loss of quality. By the late s the carte de visite appeared, a small photograph pasted onto a standard sized mount measuring approximately 4.

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The tintype had a copper frame and was housed in an embossed leather case with red velvet liner. It was copied from the Hesler photograph taken in June All versions known are paper photographs. The vendor claimed this was an original tintype acquired through a purchase of a collection of tintypes assembled over the course of the last fifty years. He offered a money back guarantee.

AMBROTYPES. The Ambrotype was the popular successor to the Daguerreotype. While the image was inferior to the Daguerreotypes, it was cheaper and easier to produce. It is generally considered to have an image quality between Daguerreotypes and tintypes.

Unearth your Jewish heritage. Knowing the type of photo can still leave a large time period, but if you know the subject of the photo, your genealogical research should be able to help you narrow that. When was the subject born? Did he live in a city or a small town? What work did he do? Both the men in my photo are young, but one appears to be older than the other, and he has arm slung around his younger brother’s shoulders.

Both are holding cigars. The elder is wearing a watch chain and a pinky ring. Sadly, the age difference doesn’t help me much.

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Make Instant Discoveries in Your Family Tree Now Imagine adding your family tree to a simple website and getting hundreds of new family history discoveries instantly. MyHeritage is offering 2 free weeks of access to their extensive collection of 9 billion historical records, as well as their matching technology that instantly connects you with new information about your ancestors.

Sign up using the link below to find out what you can uncover about your family. Daguerreotypes The daguerreotype was created by Louis Jacques Mande Daguerre and is known by photography experts as the first practical form of photography. Daguerreotypes were produced on a thin copper metal support that had a polished coating of silver that was mirror-like.

In America, daguerreotypes were often placed in hinged, wooden cases with paper or leather coverings.

The ambrotype (from Ancient Greek: ἀμβροτός — “immortal”, and τύπος — “impression”) or amphitype, also known as a collodion positive in the UK, is a positive photograph on glass made by a variant of the wet plate collodion a print on paper, it is viewed by reflected light. Like the daguerreotype, which it replaced, and like the prints produced by a.

Contact Dating Tintypes – The earliest tintypes were on heavy metal. They are stamped “Neff’s Melainotype Pat 19 Feb 56” along one edge. Sizes range from one-sixth plate to full plate see appendix El. Many are found in gilt frames or in the leather or plastic thermomolded cases of the earlier ambro-types. After the paper holders are embossed rather than printed. Uncased tintypes have been found with cancelled tax stamps adhered to the backs. The stamps date these photographs to the period of the wartime retail tax, September 1, , to August.

They “created a sensation among the ferrotypists throughout the country, and the pictures made on the chocolate-tinted surface soon became all the rage,” according to Edward M. Estabrooke During this period “rustic” photography also made its debut with its pastoral backgrounds, fake stones, wood fences and rural props. Neither the chocolate tint nor the rustic look are found in pre tintypes.

They Were popularized under the trade name Gem, and the Gem Galleries offered the tiny likenesses at what has proved to be the lowest prices in studio history. Gem Galleries flourished until about , at which time the invention of roll film and family cameras made possible larger images at modest cost. It was no longer necessary to visit a studio that specialized in the tiny likenesses.

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